natgeo

@natgeo

National Geographic

Instagram @natgeo bio, statistics, analysis, photos, videos, followers
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@natgeo basic info

How many followers @natgeo has? 158,024,349
How many profiles @natgeo follows? 128
Is @natgeo private profile? No
Is @natgeo verified profile? Yes
Is @natgeo professional profile? Yes
Is @natgeo business profile? Yes
Business category @natgeo belongs Publishers
Business category name @natgeo belongs Media/News Company

@natgeo instagram stats

How many likes per photo @natgeo has? 200,792
How many comments per photo natgeo has? 868
How often @natgeo publishes a photo on Instagram? every 4 hours
How many likes per video @natgeo has? 146,774
How many comments per video natgeo has? 1,070
How many views per video @natgeo has? 1,725,497
How often @natgeo publishes a video on Instagram? every 28 days
How many likes per post @natgeo has? 176,961
How many comments per post natgeo has? 957
How often @natgeo publishes a post on Instagram? every 12 days
Photo / Video ratio of @natgeo 55% photos / 45% videos

Latest posts by @natgeo

  • By @natgeo - Photo by @amivitale / This is Naomi Leshongoro getting a kiss from one of the baby orphaned elephants in her care at Reteti Elephant Sanctuary (@r.e.s.c.u.e) in northern Kenya. Naomi is one of the first indigenous Samburu women elephant keepers in all of Africa. Empowering women is crucial to counteract the increasing pressure placed on this fragile landscape. Reteti is opening a door to a world of possibilities where women are equally entitled to working on their own land and protecting their wildlife. Reteti is changing the way these communities relate to wildlife, and this brings a sense of pride and responsibility to the women working at the sanctuary. They know that by caring for the elephants, their efforts are reducing poaching and human-wildlife conflict. Follow @amivitale and @r.e.s.c.u.e to learn more. @conservationorg @kenyawildlifeservice @tusk_org @sandiegozoo @thephotosociety @photography.for.good #elephants #kenya #conservation #empathyiseverything @natgeo

    Photo by @amivitale / This is Naomi Leshongoro getting a kiss from one of the baby orphaned elephants in her care at Reteti Elephant Sanctuary (@r.e.s.c.u.e) in northern Kenya. Naomi is one of the first indigenous Samburu women elephant keepers in all of Africa. Empowering women is crucial to counteract the increasing pressure placed on this fragile landscape. Reteti is opening a door to a world of possibilities where women are equally entitled to working on their own land and protecting their wildlife. Reteti is changing the way these communities relate to wildlife, and this brings a sense of pride and responsibility to the women working at the sanctuary. They know that by caring for the elephants, their efforts are reducing poaching and human-wildlife conflict. Follow @amivitale and @r.e.s.c.u.e to learn more. @conservationorg @kenyawildlifeservice @tusk_org @sandiegozoo @thephotosociety @photography.for.good #elephants #kenya #conservation #empathyiseverything

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  • By @natgeo - Photo by @acacia.johnson / The last rays of winter sun slip behind the mountains of Alaska's Knik Glacier. Located on the northern end of the Chugach Mountains, this glacier is one of the most easily accessible from the nearby city of Anchorage, my hometown. To me, glaciers have always been a striking reminder of how the formation of the landscapes we live in is an active, ongoing process in a vast expanse of geologic time.

Follow me at @acacia.johnson for more stories from the natural world. #glaciers #alaska #knikglacier #aerial @natgeo

    Photo by @acacia.johnson / The last rays of winter sun slip behind the mountains of Alaska's Knik Glacier. Located on the northern end of the Chugach Mountains, this glacier is one of the most easily accessible from the nearby city of Anchorage, my hometown. To me, glaciers have always been a striking reminder of how the formation of the landscapes we live in is an active, ongoing process in a vast expanse of geologic time. Follow me at @acacia.johnson for more stories from the natural world. #glaciers #alaska #knikglacier #aerial

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  • By @natgeo - Photo by @lynseyaddario / U.S. troops with the 173rd Airborne, Battle Company, carry the body of Staff Sgt. Larry Rougle after he was killed in an ambush during Operation Rock Avalanche in the Korengal Valley in October 2007. The ambush took place during a U.S.-led offensive into the heart of Taliban territory in the mountains of northwest Afghanistan, with the goal of flushing the area of insurgents. U.S. President Joe Biden has announced he will pull all American troops from Afghanistan by September 11, 2021, ending America’s longest war. #Afghanistan @natgeo

    Photo by @lynseyaddario / U.S. troops with the 173rd Airborne, Battle Company, carry the body of Staff Sgt. Larry Rougle after he was killed in an ambush during Operation Rock Avalanche in the Korengal Valley in October 2007. The ambush took place during a U.S.-led offensive into the heart of Taliban territory in the mountains of northwest Afghanistan, with the goal of flushing the area of insurgents. U.S. President Joe Biden has announced he will pull all American troops from Afghanistan by September 11, 2021, ending America’s longest war. #Afghanistan

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  • By @natgeo - Photo by @estherhorvath / Hildago, one of the six dogs in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, is out for a walk with Piotr Kupiszewski, station leader at the Norwegian Mapping Authority’s Geodetic Earth Observatory. Ny-Ålesund is the northernmost community in the world and home to research stations operated by 10 nations. It has a year-round permanent population of 30 to 35, with the summer population reaching 120, including guest scientists. @natgeo

    Photo by @estherhorvath / Hildago, one of the six dogs in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, is out for a walk with Piotr Kupiszewski, station leader at the Norwegian Mapping Authority’s Geodetic Earth Observatory. Ny-Ålesund is the northernmost community in the world and home to research stations operated by 10 nations. It has a year-round permanent population of 30 to 35, with the summer population reaching 120, including guest scientists.

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  • By @natgeo - Photos by @TimLaman / The blue bird of paradise, arguably one of the most fabulous of the entire bird of paradise family, has an extraordinary upside-down display that you can see in the second image. Found only in the highlands of Papua New Guinea, it is sadly one of the few bird of paradise species that is considered threatened, mainly due to habitat loss. My hope is that the blue and other bird of paradise species across the New Guinea region can be ambassadors for the protection of their rainforest. 

Throughout April for Earth Day, I’m sharing endangered species whose stories I’ve told with my images in hopes of bringing them more attention. Please visit @TimLaman to see more. #bluebirdofparadsie #birdofparadise #NewGuinea #PNG #EndangeredSpecies @natgeo

    Photos by @TimLaman / The blue bird of paradise, arguably one of the most fabulous of the entire bird of paradise family, has an extraordinary upside-down display that you can see in the second image. Found only in the highlands of Papua New Guinea, it is sadly one of the few bird of paradise species that is considered threatened, mainly due to habitat loss. My hope is that the blue and other bird of paradise species across the New Guinea region can be ambassadors for the protection of their rainforest. Throughout April for Earth Day, I’m sharing endangered species whose stories I’ve told with my images in hopes of bringing them more attention. Please visit @TimLaman to see more. #bluebirdofparadsie #birdofparadise #NewGuinea #PNG #EndangeredSpecies

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  • By @natgeo - Photo by @erintrieb / One of the first stories I ever photographed was about the Acholi children of Gulu, Uganda, also known as the @natgeo

    Photo by @erintrieb / One of the first stories I ever photographed was about the Acholi children of Gulu, Uganda, also known as the "night commuters." During that time, in 2006, the LRA (Lord’s Resistance Army) trafficked children at night from their villages, forcing them into armed conflict as soldiers. To prevent kidnapping, thousands of Ugandan children walked several kilometers from their villages to town every night, to sleep in the protection of the city, either in encampments or shelters like this one. I was 23 and just out of college. I slept on a friend’s couch for six months to save money for a plane ticket to Kampala, Uganda's capital. This story marked my first experience of intimately connecting with people who welcomed me into their circle and allowed me to document their daily lives. Looking at these images 15 years later, I’m reminded of how much I still love the process and privilege of telling the stories of others. Through Facebook I can keep track of the kids I photographed—most of whom are now in their late 20s and have children of their own.

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  • By @natgeo - Photo by @michaelchristopherbrown. This year marks the ten-year anniversary of the Libyan revolution and First Civil War, a 2011 conflict fought between Colonel Muammar Gaddafi, then leader of Libya, and a number of Libyan militias seeking to replace him. During the Arab Spring, and immediately after the uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt, protests were sparked in Benghazi on February 15, 2011, which led to clashes against government forces that began firing on the crowds. The fighting spanned most of 2011, largely ending with the death of Gaddafi in late October. However, there continues to be ongoing fighting among the numerous militias, many of whom are supported by foreign interests. I spent seven months in Libya in 2011, photographing events that culminated in the book @natgeo

    Photo by @michaelchristopherbrown. This year marks the ten-year anniversary of the Libyan revolution and First Civil War, a 2011 conflict fought between Colonel Muammar Gaddafi, then leader of Libya, and a number of Libyan militias seeking to replace him. During the Arab Spring, and immediately after the uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt, protests were sparked in Benghazi on February 15, 2011, which led to clashes against government forces that began firing on the crowds. The fighting spanned most of 2011, largely ending with the death of Gaddafi in late October. However, there continues to be ongoing fighting among the numerous militias, many of whom are supported by foreign interests. I spent seven months in Libya in 2011, photographing events that culminated in the book "Libyan Sugar." In this photograph, Libyan militia members and civilians celebrate the capture of Gaddafi and the end of the war while driving a tank through the streets of Misrata, on October 28, 2011. Some of the photographs were used in the National Geographic magazine story “Young, Angry, and Wired,” published in July 2011. Follow @michaelchristopherbrown for more human stories from around the world. Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.

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  • By @natgeo - Photo by Karine Aigner @kaigner / I love this picture for what it is and the experience I had making it, but I don’t love the problem it illustrates. In 2014 Florida held a python-killing contest and has continued to do so each year. Herpers from all over participate. I had the unique opportunity to hang out with an incredible group of very talented snake hunters, who used nothing but their hands and feet and instinct to find the ever elusive and extremely invasive Burmese python. These men were in it for the challenge of the hunt, the thrill of the capture. This group of guys spent a lot of time admiring the pythons they captured—discussing them, examining their designs and unique characteristics and behaviors. But when it came time to turn them in, it was necessary to euthanize them. There was a sad silence that permeated the rest of the day. The hunters were helping the environment in a small way, but they were destroying the very creatures they are enthralled with.

The Burmese python problem in Florida is said to be the result of the pet trade. The ownership of Burmese pythons is now illegal, but it’s too late for the environment. Scientists say the python problem is responsible for a 90 percent drop in native small mammal populations in the Everglades. The snakes will never be eliminated. For more stories about humans and nature follow me @kaigner! Shot on assignment for @natgeo. #invasivespecies #pythonchallenge #snakes #python @natgeo

    Photo by Karine Aigner @kaigner / I love this picture for what it is and the experience I had making it, but I don’t love the problem it illustrates. In 2014 Florida held a python-killing contest and has continued to do so each year. Herpers from all over participate. I had the unique opportunity to hang out with an incredible group of very talented snake hunters, who used nothing but their hands and feet and instinct to find the ever elusive and extremely invasive Burmese python. These men were in it for the challenge of the hunt, the thrill of the capture. This group of guys spent a lot of time admiring the pythons they captured—discussing them, examining their designs and unique characteristics and behaviors. But when it came time to turn them in, it was necessary to euthanize them. There was a sad silence that permeated the rest of the day. The hunters were helping the environment in a small way, but they were destroying the very creatures they are enthralled with. The Burmese python problem in Florida is said to be the result of the pet trade. The ownership of Burmese pythons is now illegal, but it’s too late for the environment. Scientists say the python problem is responsible for a 90 percent drop in native small mammal populations in the Everglades. The snakes will never be eliminated. For more stories about humans and nature follow me @kaigner! Shot on assignment for @natgeo. #invasivespecies #pythonchallenge #snakes #python

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  • By @natgeo - Photo by Tomas van Houtryve @tomasvh / Seen through a hole in the roof where the spire used to be, workers build scaffolding inside the choir of the Notre Dame cathedral in Paris. Two years after a fire destroyed the roof and spire, efforts to stabilize, clean, and restore the cathedral continue at a steady pace. 

Follow @tomasvh and the public institution in charge of reconstruction, @rebatirnotredamedeparis, for more on Notre Dame. #notredamedeparis @natgeo

    Photo by Tomas van Houtryve @tomasvh / Seen through a hole in the roof where the spire used to be, workers build scaffolding inside the choir of the Notre Dame cathedral in Paris. Two years after a fire destroyed the roof and spire, efforts to stabilize, clean, and restore the cathedral continue at a steady pace. Follow @tomasvh and the public institution in charge of reconstruction, @rebatirnotredamedeparis, for more on Notre Dame. #notredamedeparis

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  • By @natgeo - Photos by @babaktafreshi and @nasa / Mars on Earth. It's incredible how some landscapes on Earth resemble the surface of our neighboring planet. I made this panorama of Chile’s Atacama Desert as the rising moon gently shone on this extremely dry environment. Swipe to compare this with a recent 360 panorama from the red planet, as seen by @nasa rover Perseverance, which landed in February. This site was once an ancient lake 3.5 billion years ago, when Mars had a thicker atmosphere and was perhaps habitable. For more astronomy and space stories follow me @babaktafreshi.

#twanight #mars #earth #perserverance #atacama @natgeo

    Photos by @babaktafreshi and @nasa / Mars on Earth. It's incredible how some landscapes on Earth resemble the surface of our neighboring planet. I made this panorama of Chile’s Atacama Desert as the rising moon gently shone on this extremely dry environment. Swipe to compare this with a recent 360 panorama from the red planet, as seen by @nasa rover Perseverance, which landed in February. This site was once an ancient lake 3.5 billion years ago, when Mars had a thicker atmosphere and was perhaps habitable. For more astronomy and space stories follow me @babaktafreshi. #twanight #mars #earth #perserverance #atacama

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  • By @natgeo - Photos by Michael Yamashita @yamashitaphoto / Springtime in tulou land: Perfectly groomed rows of tea plants surround a traditional circular tulou—which means earthen building—a communal dwelling of the Hakka people in Fujian, China. The highest grade tea leaves are picked in early spring starting now. #tulou #hakka #teaharvest #tea #teatime @natgeo

    Photos by Michael Yamashita @yamashitaphoto / Springtime in tulou land: Perfectly groomed rows of tea plants surround a traditional circular tulou—which means earthen building—a communal dwelling of the Hakka people in Fujian, China. The highest grade tea leaves are picked in early spring starting now. #tulou #hakka #teaharvest #tea #teatime

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  • By @natgeo - Photo by @BrianSkerry / Secrets of the Whales / An orca feeds on a stingray off coastal New Zealand. Orca here have figured out how to navigate shallow water to predate on the rays. A preference for certain prey and creating feeding strategies to target them is an example of the whales' unique culture.

Disney+ original series Secrets of the Whales, from @NatGeo, is streaming this Earth Day, April 22, on @DisneyPlus. In addition, my book of the same name is on sale now wherever books are sold. My work on whales is also featured in the May issue of National Geographic magazine, the Ocean Issue, available online now. Learn more about all three at Nat Geo's Planet Possible hub, our newest initiative, which aims to inform, inspire and enable consumers to live more lightly on the planet: natgeo.com/planet (link in bio).

Follow me at @BrianSkerry to keep up with all things #SecretsOfTheWhales #NatGeoEarthDay #DisneyPlus

The Walt Disney Company is majority owner of National Geographic Partners. @natgeo

    Photo by @BrianSkerry / Secrets of the Whales / An orca feeds on a stingray off coastal New Zealand. Orca here have figured out how to navigate shallow water to predate on the rays. A preference for certain prey and creating feeding strategies to target them is an example of the whales' unique culture. Disney+ original series Secrets of the Whales, from @NatGeo, is streaming this Earth Day, April 22, on @DisneyPlus. In addition, my book of the same name is on sale now wherever books are sold. My work on whales is also featured in the May issue of National Geographic magazine, the Ocean Issue, available online now. Learn more about all three at Nat Geo's Planet Possible hub, our newest initiative, which aims to inform, inspire and enable consumers to live more lightly on the planet: natgeo.com/planet (link in bio). Follow me at @BrianSkerry to keep up with all things #SecretsOfTheWhales #NatGeoEarthDay #DisneyPlus The Walt Disney Company is majority owner of National Geographic Partners.

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  • By @natgeo - Photo by Charlie Hamilton James @chamiltonjames / The Fast Five is a coalition of male cheetahs that live on the plains of Kenya's Maasai Mara Reserve. Cheetahs are the world's fastest land animal, and a coalition of five is a deadly force—able to take down prey larger than a single cheetah. As a result, they favor antelopes such as topi and wildebeest. During tourism's high season these famous cheetahs can be surrounded by 70 or 80 cars at a time. Over the last year those numbers have been reduced due to COVID-19, giving the cheetahs a bit of breathing space. @natgeo

    Photo by Charlie Hamilton James @chamiltonjames / The Fast Five is a coalition of male cheetahs that live on the plains of Kenya's Maasai Mara Reserve. Cheetahs are the world's fastest land animal, and a coalition of five is a deadly force—able to take down prey larger than a single cheetah. As a result, they favor antelopes such as topi and wildebeest. During tourism's high season these famous cheetahs can be surrounded by 70 or 80 cars at a time. Over the last year those numbers have been reduced due to COVID-19, giving the cheetahs a bit of breathing space.

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  • By @natgeo - Photo by Matthieu Paley @paleyphoto / Worldwide, air pollution kills millions every year, like a pandemic in slow motion. Here, coal smoke puffs from the chimneys of houses and gers in the early morning in Ulaanbaatar. The capital of Mongolia has grown rapidly and in an unplanned way in recent years, as nomadic herders have left the countryside and settled on the city's outskirts. Experts say insulating gers and providing better power connections would reduce home coal-burning and improve air quality. This is an unpublished image, part of a global story titled “The Deadly cost of Dirty Air” that appears in the April edition of National Geographic magazine. For more insights into our world, follow @paleyphoto #airpollution #mongoliairpollution #coal #Ulaanbaatar

Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story. @natgeo

    Photo by Matthieu Paley @paleyphoto / Worldwide, air pollution kills millions every year, like a pandemic in slow motion. Here, coal smoke puffs from the chimneys of houses and gers in the early morning in Ulaanbaatar. The capital of Mongolia has grown rapidly and in an unplanned way in recent years, as nomadic herders have left the countryside and settled on the city's outskirts. Experts say insulating gers and providing better power connections would reduce home coal-burning and improve air quality. This is an unpublished image, part of a global story titled “The Deadly cost of Dirty Air” that appears in the April edition of National Geographic magazine. For more insights into our world, follow @paleyphoto #airpollution #mongoliairpollution #coal #Ulaanbaatar Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.

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  • By @natgeo - Photo by @nataliekeyssar / Throughout history, people have turned to faith and ritual during times of crisis, often becoming more observant when confronted with loss and uncertainty. To explore this idea, I spent the past few weeks traveling across Alabama, one of the most religious U.S. states, according to the Pew Research Center, to look at how faith has intersected with one of the most difficult years anyone can remember. 

The Flatline Church at Chisholm in Montgomery, led by Pastor Dewayne Rembert, opened up two years ago with a mission to help the community and focus on outreach to the poor. When the pandemic hit, they moved to drive-in services to protect their congregation while still connecting with them and offering  support. On March 28, as storms rolled into the area, Pastor Rembert decided to hold their first indoor services in a year, citing increased levels of vaccination and lower virus levels. They carefully blocked off seating for social distancing, required masks, opened doors for ventilation, and sat separated by family group. Associate Pastor Keelan Adams gave a passionate service to a small but emotional group of attendees, moved by their first time being together following such a hard year. After the service, church volunteers served food to anyone in the area who was hungry, as part of the church’s mission to serve—despite the obstacles in its path. 

It's been a joy and an honor to spend time during these pivotal  days with spiritual leaders and communities over these past few weeks. Thank you so much to everyone who let me join them for these beautiful, hopeful moments. And huge thanks @insidenatgeo for the generous support for this project, publishing in full soon on @natgeo. Follow me @Nataliekeyssar for more stories of resilience during crisis.

Follow @natgeointhefield for real-time coverage of this developing story. @natgeo

    Photo by @nataliekeyssar / Throughout history, people have turned to faith and ritual during times of crisis, often becoming more observant when confronted with loss and uncertainty. To explore this idea, I spent the past few weeks traveling across Alabama, one of the most religious U.S. states, according to the Pew Research Center, to look at how faith has intersected with one of the most difficult years anyone can remember. The Flatline Church at Chisholm in Montgomery, led by Pastor Dewayne Rembert, opened up two years ago with a mission to help the community and focus on outreach to the poor. When the pandemic hit, they moved to drive-in services to protect their congregation while still connecting with them and offering support. On March 28, as storms rolled into the area, Pastor Rembert decided to hold their first indoor services in a year, citing increased levels of vaccination and lower virus levels. They carefully blocked off seating for social distancing, required masks, opened doors for ventilation, and sat separated by family group. Associate Pastor Keelan Adams gave a passionate service to a small but emotional group of attendees, moved by their first time being together following such a hard year. After the service, church volunteers served food to anyone in the area who was hungry, as part of the church’s mission to serve—despite the obstacles in its path. It's been a joy and an honor to spend time during these pivotal days with spiritual leaders and communities over these past few weeks. Thank you so much to everyone who let me join them for these beautiful, hopeful moments. And huge thanks @insidenatgeo for the generous support for this project, publishing in full soon on @natgeo. Follow me @Nataliekeyssar for more stories of resilience during crisis. Follow @natgeointhefield for real-time coverage of this developing story.

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  • By @natgeo - Photo by Aaron Huey @argonautphoto / Students in a Taliban madrassa in Chaman, Pakistan, on the Afghan border, 1999. Taken on slide film with my first camera the year I graduated from college. With the pullout of U.S. forces from Afghanistan just announced, I am looking back at my earliest encounters with the Taliban, before 9/11, and my work in Afghanistan in the years after, when I lived in Kabul. To hear the full stories from inside these Taliban schools follow @argonautphoto’s IGTV. @natgeo

    Photo by Aaron Huey @argonautphoto / Students in a Taliban madrassa in Chaman, Pakistan, on the Afghan border, 1999. Taken on slide film with my first camera the year I graduated from college. With the pullout of U.S. forces from Afghanistan just announced, I am looking back at my earliest encounters with the Taliban, before 9/11, and my work in Afghanistan in the years after, when I lived in Kabul. To hear the full stories from inside these Taliban schools follow @argonautphoto’s IGTV.

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  • By @natgeo - Photos by @renan_ozturk / words by @m_synnott, from #TheLostWorldExpedition story. I’m pretty sure that I was the one who first started calling it mud world. It seemed an apt description, considering that within hours of first entering the jungle, our lives became a war of attrition against the oozing muck, from which there seemed to be no escape. It was supposed to be the dry season, but it rained every single day. 

The key to survival was a wet-dry system. By day, we did our best to embrace the filth and wetness. But at night, we found respite, if only briefly, by changing into dry clothes and slipping into our sleeping bags and hammocks beneath elaborate post- and-beam tarp structures, constructed by our Akawaio guides. 

My first night in the jungle, I sat in my hammock, legs dangling, wondering what to do with my mud-caked boots. I thought I was being clever when I stuffed them into a waterproof duffel, not realizing there was food in it—and I had failed to completely zip it shut. When I slipped back into my boots in the morning, giant red ants attacked so viciously they actually chewed through my sock.

We crossed countless rivers and small creeks that braid the floodplain, which lies east of the Pakaraima Mountains. Most of these crossings were facilitated with log bridges. Some were natural, others were expertly dropped by the Akawaios, who could fell a tree with their cutlasses in a matter of seconds. On the bigger rivers, they often built elaborate railings, which they lashed in place with vines and strips of bark. But in other places, there would be nothing but a thin, moss-covered log, high above the water. 

And there was carnage. Renan caught his foot on a vine and face planted in the mud. @taylorfreesolo slipped and straddled a log. And I jammed my bare foot between two slimy rocks in the Krapung River, shaving all the skin off the bone on the inside of my ankle—an injury that would eventually land me in the hospital. @natgeo

    Photos by @renan_ozturk / words by @m_synnott, from #TheLostWorldExpedition story. I’m pretty sure that I was the one who first started calling it mud world. It seemed an apt description, considering that within hours of first entering the jungle, our lives became a war of attrition against the oozing muck, from which there seemed to be no escape. It was supposed to be the dry season, but it rained every single day. The key to survival was a wet-dry system. By day, we did our best to embrace the filth and wetness. But at night, we found respite, if only briefly, by changing into dry clothes and slipping into our sleeping bags and hammocks beneath elaborate post- and-beam tarp structures, constructed by our Akawaio guides. My first night in the jungle, I sat in my hammock, legs dangling, wondering what to do with my mud-caked boots. I thought I was being clever when I stuffed them into a waterproof duffel, not realizing there was food in it—and I had failed to completely zip it shut. When I slipped back into my boots in the morning, giant red ants attacked so viciously they actually chewed through my sock. We crossed countless rivers and small creeks that braid the floodplain, which lies east of the Pakaraima Mountains. Most of these crossings were facilitated with log bridges. Some were natural, others were expertly dropped by the Akawaios, who could fell a tree with their cutlasses in a matter of seconds. On the bigger rivers, they often built elaborate railings, which they lashed in place with vines and strips of bark. But in other places, there would be nothing but a thin, moss-covered log, high above the water. And there was carnage. Renan caught his foot on a vine and face planted in the mud. @taylorfreesolo slipped and straddled a log. And I jammed my bare foot between two slimy rocks in the Krapung River, shaving all the skin off the bone on the inside of my ankle—an injury that would eventually land me in the hospital.

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  • By @natgeo - Nat Geo photographer @BrianSkerry swims among orca whales as they eat herring around fishing nets off the coast of Norway. Stunning whale footage taken by Steve De Neef.

The Disney+ original series, @natgeo

    Nat Geo photographer @BrianSkerry swims among orca whales as they eat herring around fishing nets off the coast of Norway. Stunning whale footage taken by Steve De Neef. The Disney+ original series, "Secrets of the Whales," from @NatGeo, is streaming this Earth Day, April 22, on @DisneyPlus. A book of the same name is on sale now wherever books are sold, and whales are also featured as the cover story for the May issue of the magazine, available online now. Learn more about all three at Nat Geo's Planet Possible hub, our newest initiative, which aims to inform, inspire, and enable consumers to live more lightly on the planet: natgeo.com/planet. Follow me at @BrianSkerry to keep up with all things #SecretsOfTheWhales. #NatGeoEarthDay #DisneyPlus The Walt Disney Company is majority owner of National Geographic Partners.

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  • By @natgeo - Time-lapse video by Pete McBride @pedromcbride / Lightning crackles across the sky over the Grand Canyon in Arizona. Though Arizona typically sees less than 10 inches of annual rainfall, during the state's monsoon season—generally mid-June to mid-September—thunderstorms can generate two or three inches in less than a day's time, which then leads to flash floods and water accumulation in low-lying areas. For more from this open-air cathedral, follow @pedromcbride. #grandcanyon #lightning #timelapse #nature @natgeo

    Time-lapse video by Pete McBride @pedromcbride / Lightning crackles across the sky over the Grand Canyon in Arizona. Though Arizona typically sees less than 10 inches of annual rainfall, during the state's monsoon season—generally mid-June to mid-September—thunderstorms can generate two or three inches in less than a day's time, which then leads to flash floods and water accumulation in low-lying areas. For more from this open-air cathedral, follow @pedromcbride. #grandcanyon #lightning #timelapse #nature

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  • By @natgeo - Photo by Muhammed Muheisen @mmuheisen / How small we appear against monuments of history. In the ancient city of Petra in Jordan, Al Khazneh (Arabic for @natgeo

    Photo by Muhammed Muheisen @mmuheisen / How small we appear against monuments of history. In the ancient city of Petra in Jordan, Al Khazneh (Arabic for "the treasury") is one of many facades carved into the mountains. For more photos and videos from different parts of the world, follow me @mmuheisen and @mmuheisenpublic #muhammedmuheisen #Jordan #الاردن #Petra

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  • By @natgeo - Photo by @paoloverzone / In the Moroccan desert, while excavating for long hours under the summer sun, researchers at the Spinosaurus dig site nestle their belongings in the shifting shadow of a downhill boulder, hoping to keep their water cool as long as possible.

Spinosaurus was one of the largest predatory dinosaurs of all time. It is named after the elongated dorsal spines that supported an enormous “sail” of skin. In contrast to other dinosaurs–which are predominantly terrestrial–a long list of anatomical features are indicative of Spinosaurus being adapted to live in freshwater, like crocodiles and hippopotamuses. Follow @paoloverzone for more photos and stories.

Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story. @natgeo

    Photo by @paoloverzone / In the Moroccan desert, while excavating for long hours under the summer sun, researchers at the Spinosaurus dig site nestle their belongings in the shifting shadow of a downhill boulder, hoping to keep their water cool as long as possible. Spinosaurus was one of the largest predatory dinosaurs of all time. It is named after the elongated dorsal spines that supported an enormous “sail” of skin. In contrast to other dinosaurs–which are predominantly terrestrial–a long list of anatomical features are indicative of Spinosaurus being adapted to live in freshwater, like crocodiles and hippopotamuses. Follow @paoloverzone for more photos and stories. Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.

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  • By @natgeo - Video by @joelsartore / Two female clouded leopard cubs are held by one of their caretakers @nashvillezoo. Like any newborn kitten, they are small and helpless. It isn’t until they are at least two weeks old that their eyes open and their teeth begin to emerge. They'll accept solid food between 7-10 weeks of age, but will continue to nurse, and are not fully weaned until they are six months old. #cloudedleopard #cubs #cat #PhotoArk #savetogether @natgeo

    Video by @joelsartore / Two female clouded leopard cubs are held by one of their caretakers @nashvillezoo. Like any newborn kitten, they are small and helpless. It isn’t until they are at least two weeks old that their eyes open and their teeth begin to emerge. They'll accept solid food between 7-10 weeks of age, but will continue to nurse, and are not fully weaned until they are six months old. #cloudedleopard #cubs #cat #PhotoArk #savetogether

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  • By @natgeo - @natgeo

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  • By @natgeo - Sponsored by @SamsungMobileUSA // Nat Geo photographer Katie Orlinsky enlists two young photographers to join her in Alaska's Mat-Su Valley to create visual stories of off-season sled dog life. // Transform how you share your world with the @samsungmobileusa #GalaxyS20 5G series. @natgeo

    Sponsored by @SamsungMobileUSA // Nat Geo photographer Katie Orlinsky enlists two young photographers to join her in Alaska's Mat-Su Valley to create visual stories of off-season sled dog life. // Transform how you share your world with the @samsungmobileusa #GalaxyS20 5G series.

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