By @instagram - “I am, and we are, our ancestors’ wildest dreams,” says organizer and strategist Chelsea Miller (@thechelseamiller). “As a first-generation American and Black woman rooted in the diaspora, I show up to re-imagine systems, connect our present day to history and amplify the voices within our movements.”
 
In May 2020, a few days after the death of George Floyd, Chelsea, Nialah Edari (@nialahedari) and Nia White (@theniawhite) organized a non-violent protest in solidarity with others across the country. “That protest catapulted us to the frontlines during the resurgence of our generation’s civil rights movement. We coined the name Freedom March NYC (@freedommarchnyc), and through our work became one of the largest youth-led civil rights organizations in the nation.” In November, members of George Floyd’s family presented Chelsea and Nialah with the 2021 Muhammad Ali Humanitarian Confidence Award for this work.
 
“I attribute the sustainability of our work to the fact that it is grounded in sisterhood and community. We show up as our authentic selves, giving each other permission to evolve, rest and disrupt in the ways that speak to not only the movement but who we are as people,” says Chelsea, who co-founded Women Everywhere Believe (@webelieve.inc) with Akua Obeng-Akrofi (@akuaobengakrofi) “to create spaces for women and girls of color to lead.”
 
“I describe myself as a daughter, sister, friend, visionary and social architect. These days, I focus more so on who I am and less on what I do. Our generation is so dynamic that it’s common for us to do many things as an extension of who we are. My work is a testament to the power of young people and our ability to see the world not simply as it is, but as it should be. We are not the leaders of tomorrow; we are the leaders of today.”
 
 Photo of @thechelseamiller by @tajwarahad @instagram Download

“I am, and we are, our ancestors’ wildest dreams,” says organizer and strategist Chelsea Miller (@thechelseamiller). “As a first-generation American and Black woman rooted in the diaspora, I show up to re-imagine systems, connect our present day to history and amplify the voices within our movements.” In May 2020, a few days after the death of George Floyd, Chelsea, Nialah Edari (@nialahedari) and Nia White (@theniawhite) organized a non-violent protest in solidarity with others across the country. “That protest catapulted us to the frontlines during the resurgence of our generation’s civil rights movement. We coined the name Freedom March NYC (@freedommarchnyc), and through our work became one of the largest youth-led civil rights organizations in the nation.” In November, members of George Floyd’s family presented Chelsea and Nialah with the 2021 Muhammad Ali Humanitarian Confidence Award for this work. “I attribute the sustainability of our work to the fact that it is grounded in sisterhood and community. We show up as our authentic selves, giving each other permission to evolve, rest and disrupt in the ways that speak to not only the movement but who we are as people,” says Chelsea, who co-founded Women Everywhere Believe (@webelieve.inc) with Akua Obeng-Akrofi (@akuaobengakrofi) “to create spaces for women and girls of color to lead.” “I describe myself as a daughter, sister, friend, visionary and social architect. These days, I focus more so on who I am and less on what I do. Our generation is so dynamic that it’s common for us to do many things as an extension of who we are. My work is a testament to the power of young people and our ability to see the world not simply as it is, but as it should be. We are not the leaders of tomorrow; we are the leaders of today.” Photo of @thechelseamiller by @tajwarahad

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